Black-Owned Health and Wellness Businesses to Support Now and Always

As the country is still grappling with the tragic death of George Floyd and the ongoing protests in its wake, musician and activist Calvin Martyr has launched #BlackOutDay2020 on July 7. This campaign calls for an economic boycott where the Black community pauses on buying to highlight their economic spending power. If they do spend money, they are encouraged to buy from Black-owned businesses only.

Just like the fashion and beauty industries, the wellness and health space is full of brands that are founded and run by Black women and men. Whether they’re selling aromatherapy candles, producing fitness-minded podcasts or shattering stigmas of what it means to be “well” for Black women, each of these companies was once just a dream and is now a hard-earned reality.

But don’t just shop these Black-owned businesses today, or this week. Support them regularly, engage with them on social media and spread

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Arizona health deptartment orders gyms to close amid COVID spikes or face legal action

The Arizona Department of Health Services ordered three of the state’s gyms to close immediately amid significant spikes in coronavirus or face legal action.

Two of the gyms — LifeTime Fitness, Tempe and LifeTime Fitness, Camelback — agreed to comply with the order while the third gym, Mountainside Fitness, Scottsdale Shea, refused, the agency said in a statement.

“ADHS has agreed to partner with LifeTime Fitness to develop examples of best practices for the fitness industry to provide technical assistance for other fitness professionals,” the statement read.

On Thursday, the department ordered the gyms to close immediately after they learned “certain fitness centers were not complying with Governor [Doug] Ducey’s Executive Order.”

The gyms had to respond by noon local time Friday regarding their compliance.

Department director Dr. Cara Christ said LifeTime’s agreement “is in the best interest of all Arizonans.”

Mountainside, on the other hand, “made it clear

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Wellness in the COVID era

Before long, wellness will be measured by more than the macabre checklist of curve-flattening behavior that’s defined life under Covid-19. Soon our well-being will demand more – the presence of a positive, not just the absence of a negative.

It’s a golden opportunity to restart life down a healthier path. But how? Before the coronavirus, 2020 actually had been a good year for wellness in medical journals. As we regain mobility, these studies are worth recalling. Wellness is closer than you might think.

According to leading lights, our long-term welfare is tied in no small part to having friends, exercising regularly and drinking coffee. Laughter, lunges and lattes – could it really be that simple? I think so.

Earlier this year, The Wall Street Journal cited a Harvard study focusing on the importance of male friendship. According to the research, the single best predictor of a man’s health and happiness

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How lockdown closed the gender fitness gap among children

Girl exercising - Getty
Girl exercising – Getty

Last April, this paper launched the Girls, Inspired campaign in a bid to close the gender fitness gap after it was found just eight per cent of girls aged between 11 and 18 were doing the recommended daily hour of activity, compared to 16 per cent of boys.

The campaign came about after research showed millions of girls in the UK were falling off a fitness cliff after primary school, with statements like, “I don’t like boys watching me” and “I have my period”, cited as reasons for not wanting to do PE or play sport.  

A little over a year later, and lockdown seems to have reversed this trend, but to the detriment of boys. Sport England is set to release data this week that shows girls are becoming more active than boys during lockdown, something Sport England’s Alison Donnelly says she finds “fascinating”.

“I

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